Mother’s & Father’s Day are coming soon!

VIP Rounds of Golf with a Dozen Balls Bundles
Available online-only
NOW- June 16th

We love to celebrate family at Dragonfly Golf Club. That’s why, for both Mother’s Day & Father’s Day, we’re offering Rounds of Golf with Golf Balls Bundles (available online-only) so you can get the perfect gift for Mom & Dad.

  • Option 1 – $125 | 2 VIP 18-hole golf certificates  & 1 dozen Bridgestone Tour B golf balls
  • Option 2 -$199 | 4 VIP 18-hole golf certificates  & 1 dozen Bridgestone Tour B golf balls

*Tax: $1.50 | Shipping: $9.00 (in-store pick-up available)

Click HERE to check it out! 

Each VIP Certificate includes 18 holes for one person with cart fee induced.  VIP Certificates may be redeemed any day at any time and do not expire.

ADDTIONAL DETAILS:

  • Purchases may be made in the Dragonfly online store only
  • VIP certificates may be used any day at any time, based on availability
  • VIP certificates include cart fee
  • VIP certificates do not expire
  • VIP certificates may be redeemed individually
  • VIP certificates not valid for redemption until a minimum of 48 hours after purchase
  • Refunds will not be available for lost or unused VIP certificates
  • Rain checks will not be available for incomplete rounds of golf
  • VIP certificates may not be used in conjunction with tournaments
  • Type of Tour B ball may be selected at check out
  • Golf balls may not be returned or traded

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Need help with Swing Consistency?

Steal Bryson DeChambeau’s secret to swing consistency

Get better swing plane where it matters, near the ball

By Matthew Rudy
Source: GolfDigest

The same few words seem to pop up when describing Bryson DeChambeau’s game: Unique, quirky, or even strange.
What isn’t strange are the results. DeChambeau won his third career PGA Tour event at the Northern Trust, smashing the field by four shots with elite ball-striking using his single-length Cobra irons. DeChambeau hit 16 greens on Sunday on his way to his fourth round of 69 or lower at Ridgewood Country Club, and he made just six bogeys on the week.
The precision and consistency in DeChambeau’s game comes in part from his determination to make every swing on the same plane—literally. “I’ve run his swing on my 3D analysis software, and Bryson is literally more planar than the swing robots they use to design clubs,” says Golf Digest 50 Best Teacher Michael Jacobs. “Even if you wanted to try to do that yourself, I don’t think the average player has the coordination. He really is unique.”

But even with DeChambeau’s idiosyncratic method, there are things you can take away and use to tweak your game. “What gets weekend players in trouble is pushing and pulling on the club with too much force that’s perpendicular to the direction of the swing,” says Jacobs, who is based at Rock Hill Golf & Country Club in Manorville, NY. “That forcing of the club makes the club respond ‘out of plane,” which requires you to make a compensating move to recover.”

You don’t need to try to get your swing on a consistent plane throughout, as long as you can produce more consistency through the “execution phase,” says Jacobs—which is about hip high to hip high. “That’s where swing plane really matters,” he says. “Film your swing from down the line, with the camera on the ball line, and practice making swings where the club doesn’t move very much off the plane line in that phase. That’s going to come from a more neutral address position, where you aren’t aligning your shoulders, hips and feet at different targets, and from more neutral body motions. Get that phase down and you’re going to hit much more consistent shots.”

Link to article: Click HERE

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Practice to make the perfect putt!

Here are some great tips we found for making the perfect putt!

3 drills that will build a great putting stroke

By Todd McGill
Source: GolfWRX

When you find yourself scratching your head because of all the putts you’re missing, take the time to hit the practice green and work out the kinks. All players go through slumps and face times when their stroke needs touching up, these three drills will go a long way in helping to reestablish a solid putting motion.

1. 4 Tee Drill
This drill is great for focusing on center contact as well as helping to maintain a square putter face through impact.
Most players will associate this drill with the two tees that many players on tour use for solid contact. But what makes this drill different is that by having two sets of tees, it forces us to have a good takeaway, as well as a good, follow through. Just have the two sets spaced 3 to 5 inches apart with the openings of the two sets being slightly wider than your putter. From there, any unwanted lateral movement with your putting stroke will be met by a tee.

2. Coin Drill
This drill pertains to those who tend to look up before hitting a putt which throws off our follow through and makes us manipulate the head. We do this for different reasons, though none of them are justifiable. Because those that keep their head down through the stroke will allow you to have better speed, control and just make a better stroke in general.
To perform this drill, just place the ball on top of the coin and make your stroke. Focusing on seeing the coin after you hit your putt before looking up.

3. Maintain the Triangle drill
One of the biggest things that I see in high handicap golfers or just bad putters, in general, is that they either don’t achieve an upside-down triangle from their shoulders, down the arms, and into the hands as pictured above. If they do, it often breaks down in their stroke. Either way, both result in an inconsistent strike and stroke motion. It also makes it harder to judge speed and makes it easier to manipulate the face which affects your ability to get the ball started online.
I use a plastic brace in the photo to hold my triangle, however, you can use a ball or balloon to place in between the forearms to achieve the same thing.
These three drills will help you establish proper muscle memory and promote strong techniques to help you roll the rock!

Link to article: http://bit.ly/2V109Zq
 

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ASCE Tournament

How to hit the deceptive ‘fluffy’ lie chip shot, according to a three-time PGA Tour winner

Source: GOLF.com
By GOLF Editors

PGA Tour player Russell Henley explains how to hit the tricky, fluffy chip shot…

You missed the green, but hey, the ball’s sitting up in the rough. Good, right? Maybe. In this situation, it’s not always certain how the ball will come out. As with all short-game shots, crisp contact is the key.

Step 1: Even if you’re short-sided, refrain from opening the face too much. With the ball up, you risk sliding the club right underneath it if you add extra loft. The ball won’t go anywhere. I keep the face square in this situation, or barely opened if I really need more loft to stop it close.

Step 2: I swing as if I’m hitting a little draw, with the club moving in-to-out and my hands rolling over slightly through impact. This helps the club remain shallow, which usually results in cleaner contact. My main thought is to get as many grooves on the ball as possible. Think “glide,” not “chop.”

Link to article: Click here

 

NCGA Four-Ball Results from Dragonfly

Kim and Silva pair up to take the title on Saturday, April 13 at Dragonfly Golf Club.

Use the link below for full results.

https://www.golfgenius.com/pages/1789919

Brent Grant wins Fresno Open at Dragonfly Golf Club

1 Brent Grant  Murrieta, CA $2,300.00 -13 68 69 69 206
T2 Connor Blick  Alamo, CA $1,050.00 -10 73 69 67 209
T2 Jeremy Tuggy  Los Angeles, CA $1,050.00 -10 73 68 68 209
T2 Coy Dobson  Austin, TX $1,050.00 -10 70 68 71 209
5 Mikey McGinn  Porterville, CA $750.00 -8 69 71 71 211
T6 Trevor Clayton  Clovis, CA $600.00 -6 75 69 69 213
T6 Patrick Grimes  Menlo Park, CA $600.00 -6 67 74 72 213
T8 Michael Feuerstein  La Jolla, CA $250.00 -5 71 74 69 214
T8 Alex Franklin  San Rafael, CA $250.00 -5 67 72 75 214

Additional Scores:

https://goldencuptour.bluegolf.com/bluegolf/goldencuptour19/event/goldencuptour195/contest/1/leaderboard.htm